July 15, 2013

How Could George Zimmerman Be Innocent?


Who is that guy  following me in that car?

I don’t know him, and I’m sure he doesn’t know me. Could he be a plain clothes cop? He’s talking to someone on a phone or a radio. I wish I knew what they were saying.

Is he really following me? Yes, he is. I turned a corner and he turned a corner. He looks like trouble.

Did he mistake me for somebody who owes him money? What’s up with him?

Oh God. He just got out of his car. HE JUST GOT OUT OF HIS CAR.

He’s walking up to me. I’m scared. Better not show it. I wish I had stayed at the house. I don’t know anybody around here. Who will help me?

OK. If he comes up to me, I’ve got to get past him. Is he a thief? Does he want my phone? Does he want money? I thought this was a safe neighborhood.  It looks safe, but it’s not safe.

Don’t put your hands on me!  Get away from me!  GET AWAY!!  I’ve got him down---now, I have to get away. JUST GET AWAY. JUST GET BACK TO THE HOUSE. GET AWAY FROM THIS MAN!

Oh God, he’s got a gun. Stop. Hey, stop it! Can’t let him shoot me…can’t let him shoot me…HELP—somebody help me…HELP ME!! Please, God, help me…he’s going to kill me, HE’S GOING TO KILL ME.

I’m shot…oh God, save me, he shot me. HE SHOT ME. Save me…help me, somebody help me, save me...

I'm dead.


***************************************************
When George Zimmerman stepped out of his car---after receiving clear directions from police dispatch to remain inside his vehicle-- his moral innocence disappeared.

George created the situation which led to his fear and George precipitated the fight that frightened him enough to kill Trayvon Martin.

The jurors in Sanford, Florida may have been tired and wanting to go home. Maybe they honestly believed George Zimmerman was completely innocent of any wrongdoing.

 I don’t know much about Sanford, but it must be a scary place if the folks who live there and serve on juries believe it’s OK to pick a fight, kill your opponent when you realize you are losing the fight, and then walk away, having been declared legally “not guilty.”

There may be civil suits, federal civil rights suits, more protests, books, movie deals, interviews, news analysis on the Sunday morning news talk shows, etc. Regardless of the outcomes of all of these possible follow-ups to the jury’s verdict, George Zimmerman is morally guilty. 

Nothing can change that truth.
  

No comments: